Nu~anc~es, or: Bustle

A ‘Waltz wave’

Dedicated to Murisopsis

Break~
ing eve~
ry
word in~
to syl~la~
bles forc~
es
one's read~
ers to de~
cel~er~ate be~
cause, oth~er~
wise, mean~
ing~
ful nu~
anc~es go
en~tire~
ly
un~no~
ticed.

38 thoughts on “Nu~anc~es, or: Bustle”

  1. Hehe! I’m so glad that my OCD has inspired you to really put the Waltz wave to the test. I did have to s l o w d o w n to read this one – well done!!

      1. 🀣🀣🀣
        It’s amazing how much time we “waste” , it takes” to learn or how much fun we have”
        I think it’s some of both. ❀️

  2. As you know I like to do those between line breaks occasionally, but this is taking it to new heights. It does force the reader to pay attention. I’ll put it on my list of forms to try. (K)

    1. I was just experimenting… it’s not a device that I tend to use, as you know… but maybe I’ll use it more in the future, having played with it a bit here πŸ™‚

      Much love,
      David

              1. I don’t do every dVerse–sometimes none per week in fact, but I like to do at least one. I do Colleen about half the time. I used to do Sue Vincent’s photo prompt most weeks–I do miss her photos as inspiration for my watercolors. I do the Kick-About which is every two weeks. And earthweal and Thursday Doors and various other prompts on and off. And often I combine them. It all depends on time, and what appeals to me. But I’m about to take a break from the internet altogether for a few weeks–I do that every once in awhile too.

  3. I definitely decelerated when reading this, but I grasped the meaning eventually (my poor eyeballs, though) πŸ˜€ I love the accentuation on the meter and syllables, and if I were to take this deeper, I’d say it gives us an outlook to slow down when reading to truly grasp the content. There’s all the time in the world. Very funny and well written, David! Like I said, it’s always something new with you and that’s what makes your work extra, extra enjoyable to read.

  4. Very clever, David. This reminded me of teaching iambic pentameter to HS seniors who struggled with syllables. Our first of many hurdles when learning this structure. πŸ€ͺ

  5. Nicely done David, very intricate and cleverly broken down! πŸ˜πŸ‘ Really makes a person slow down and read it carefully; slowly read it!

    1. She wrote to me that she didn’t like this form of poetry because she doesn’t like being forced to break words into syllables across lines… so that made me wonder what it would look like if I took that to an extreme πŸ˜€

      ❀
      David

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