Raw Deal, or: Total Recall

A dribble

The USA invaded
Iraq when I was in fifth
grade \\ I recall our
teacher telling us to write supportive
letters to our soldiers.

The dribble

The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted).

The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known as the drabble, a story consisting of exactly 100 words. [READ MORE]

22 thoughts on “Raw Deal, or: Total Recall”

  1. As someone who served from 1990 to 2010 and has no regrets about it, thank you Ben. I received such a letter during one of my deployments and have it stored someplace. It is easy to forget at times how uncertain a lot of things were back then. Letters like the one I got helped give me a sense of purpose.

    1. That’s really amazing, Patrick. ❤ It's nice to know that letters like that actually matter to the soldiers… I remember feeling (in fifth grade) that the soldier probably wouldn't care about my letter because he doesn't even know me… I mean, I still wrote it, but I remember feeling doubtful about the project.

      By the way, please feel free to call me ‘David’, which is my first name. The word ‘ben’ just means ‘son of’ in Hebrew… my pen name is confusing, I know – I’m sorry about that!

      Yours,
      David

      1. I apologize David. I had only read “Raw Deal, or: Total Recall” and saw the by line.

        Several people in my unit got letters from kids like that. Mine I received in Dec. of 01 when the horrors of 9/11 were still very fresh in everyone’s mind. I had made a promise then that I would everything in my power to prevent something like that happening again. That letter, and like the one you wrote, only strengthened my conviction.

        So again, thank you David for the letter.

  2. I’ve made my opinion on war known. I’m all for supporting the troops but really our leaders need to understand that soldiers are the sons and daughters of American citizens. I wonder if they would be so eager to start wars or send soldiers to intervene if it was their child on the front lines?

    1. yes, I did – I don’t really remember what I wrote any more… but our teacher had a family member stationed overseas, and he distributed our letters to his fellow soldiers, if I recall correctly.

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