Tongue, or: Cheek

An American sentence:

Some writers produce pretentious, banal sentences. Just ignore them.


What’s an ‘American Sentence’?

Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing the line count freed the American Sentence up for the idiosyncrasies of English phonemes.

The requirements:

  1. Composed in one line;
  2. Syllabic, 17 syllables;
  3. Condensed, written with no unnecessary words or articles;
  4. Complete sentence or sentences;
  5. Includes a turn or enlightenment.

P.S. Shabbat Shalom!

I’m offline for the Jewish Sabbath for ~25 hours from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday. I look forward to reconnecting with you soon!

17 thoughts on “Tongue, or: Cheek”

  1. Wise words my friend! You are absolutely correct! πŸ˜πŸ‘

    PS: And again thanks for inspiring me to write a new poem β€œPoet, Poems and … :P”
    Please review it πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™πŸ™
    I wanted to post the link, then thought it might not be proper “Commenting etiquette” πŸ˜‰ πŸ˜› πŸ˜€

    1. Joe, I don’t mind other poets posting links in their comments, as long as they’re actually interacting with me in a friendly, substantive way, rather than just posting links on my blog as if it were a billboard. Please do share your link.

      ❀
      David

  2. By “them”, do you mean we should ignore the writers, or just their (bad) sentences?
    Nice work, David.
    I included a plastic reptile this morning, too! Have a GREAT day.

  3. Interesting challenge. Hemingway was the master of sentences. No adverbs and no filler words, just to the point. Although, James Elroy, the crime author takes it too far with his static machine gun fire three-word sentences.

    1. πŸ’ Phil πŸ’ – You know, the hay(na)ku form of micropoetry is only 6 words… it could be combined with Hemingway’s six word story to create a mini-poem/story!

      -David

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