Two’s company, or: Three’s a crowd

Three lanternes

one
alone
quiet time
contemplation
self
two
loving
company
conversation
pair
three
awkward
unwelcome
nosey Parker
crowd

Lanterne (or: Lanturne)

A lanterne is a type of cinquain (five line poem) that has one syllable in the 1st line, two syllables in the 2nd line, three syllables in the 3rd line, four syllables in the 4th line, and one syllable in the 5th line. The poem itself was named after the way the poem resembles a lantern after it has been centered on the page.

It is also important that each line of the lanterne must be able to stand on its own. So, if it were to be separated from the poem, it would make sense in and of itself. When combined, each line contributes to the power and effectiveness of the poem. In some cases, the title of the lanterne itself can be connected to the contents within.


#TankaTuesday

The above set of three lanternes was written for Colleen Chesebro’s syllabic poetry prompt.


Let’s write poetry together!

When it comes to partnership, some humans can make their lives alone – it’s possible. But creatively, it’s more like painting: you can’t just use the same colours in every painting. It’s just not an option. You can’t take the same photograph every time and live with art forms with no differences.

Ben Harper (b. 1969)

Would you like to create poetry with me and have a completed poem of yours featured here at the Skeptic’s Kaddish? I am very excited to have launched the ‘Poetry Partners’ initiative and am looking forward to meeting and creating with you… Check it out!

43 thoughts on “Two’s company, or: Three’s a crowd”

  1. Very enjoyable and true!! I had an older relative living with us for some time… It was very awkward on my personal routine… ๐Ÿ˜‰

  2. David, I love your poem. I couldn’t help but smile — you captured each state (one, two, three) perfectly! ๐Ÿ˜Š

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