Being dismissed, or: Death sentence

An American sentence: Being dismissed from the hospital, for some, is like a death sentence. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt… Continue reading Being dismissed, or: Death sentence

Brilliant verses, or: Childlike wonder

An American sentence: The most brilliant verses intoxicate us with childlike wonder. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing the… Continue reading Brilliant verses, or: Childlike wonder

Random acts, or: Kindness

An American sentence: A stranger's reusable bag tore; I carted her groceries home. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing… Continue reading Random acts, or: Kindness

Within the lines, or: Outside the box

An American sentence: Jigsaw puzzles and painting by numbers allow artistry no room. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing… Continue reading Within the lines, or: Outside the box

Would you like a cone, or: A cup?

An American sentence: She recalled weekly Friday ice cream outings with her father fondly. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that… Continue reading Would you like a cone, or: A cup?

Like mother, or: Like son

An American sentence: Looking up from her work, she thrilled at her son reading her childhood books. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total.… Continue reading Like mother, or: Like son

Relief, or: Self-judgment

An American sentence: I sip hot morning coffee, sighing with deep relief and self-judgment. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that… Continue reading Relief, or: Self-judgment

On my hands, or: In cold blood

An American sentence: Hands bloodied, I grin. Killing mosquitoes brings me cold satisfaction. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing… Continue reading On my hands, or: In cold blood