The cure for anything

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea. -Karen Blixen (1885 – 1962) For WQW this week, we are encouraged to write about a memorable trip; but, to be honest, I'm rather a homebody. In fact, for years, when my daughter was very little, I resisted going to the beach with… Continue reading The cure for anything

The White Beach Hut, or: Normans Bay

A 'Minute Poem' The sun-Bleached porch is where She sits; Ripples transmit Forbidden Words; Sea-sounds; pert Birds; She gazes up at Haze Of blue; Love soars forth true; Solitude reigns Among sand Grains; And~ Locked away treasures Of shells Guarded by swells; God's Artless art Unlocks the Heart; “I gaze at circling gulls in a… Continue reading The White Beach Hut, or: Normans Bay

All work, or: No play

Poetry Partners #118 A poem by Murisopsis of 'A Different Perspective' Laying down lies Lying down lanes Climbing the ladder Being a pain Practicing patience Patiently pacing Working on papers Checking the spacing Writing reminders Reminded of rights Weekly pay stubs Staying up nights Hurrying hours Ours aren’t a plus Docked for tardies Vacation’s a… Continue reading All work, or: No play

Jerusalem, or: Haifa

I cheated on Jerusalem with Haifa of the free; free; free of strife, of tension, not to mention: of hostility; Floating in Haifa, 'pon the sea, squinting at the sun, one with wave breaks, done playing brave; beaming, having fun; I cheated on Jerusalem with Haifa for a time, time, time; heart charting its smooth… Continue reading Jerusalem, or: Haifa

Wisps whirl, or: Rumbles growl

An Octelle Swells, lulls, ripples, captivating; Lazy drifting, bobbing, waiting; Wisps whirl far as eye can see; Fluffy duvet soothes rough sea; Rumbles growl into great roar; Tumble, rise, gasp, more-more-more! Swells, lulls, ripples, captivating; Lazy drifting, bobbing, waiting Octelle eight lines using personification and symbolism in a telling manner; syllabic: 8, 8, 7, 7,… Continue reading Wisps whirl, or: Rumbles growl

Foreseen, or: Farsighted

An American sentence: Squinting, a slender girl stops searching the murky sea for her glasses. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt… Continue reading Foreseen, or: Farsighted

Mirthful hoots, or: Bobbing heads

A serious limerick Having never before experienced the seas, The tykes feared going in past their knees; Leery of foamy waves, They waded, trying to be brave, T'wards their folks' mirthful hoots in the breeze. A silly limerick Seeing only the adults' bobbing heads, The tykes took their parents for dead; 'Oh, gosh golly!' they… Continue reading Mirthful hoots, or: Bobbing heads