It’s normal, or: That’s how they learn, Honey

An American sentence: Baby poets constantly put forms in their mouths to learn about them. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt… Continue reading It’s normal, or: That’s how they learn, Honey

Floor, or: Ceiling

My 2nd kyrielle Kyrielle's rhyme scheme's open, but Three verses is (they say!) the floor. Still, I have come to heed my gut: Few verses are quite often more. I felt doubtful of short forms once; Epics seemed to pack louder roar... Now I know micros aren't runts! Few verses are quite often more. May… Continue reading Floor, or: Ceiling

Core, or: Seeded

Sevenling (Fine, fine.) Fine, fine. You want to know? He was more noble; more brilliant; and more athletic than me. Just... more, more... All of the above is true, but I was always the better communicator; the more imaginative one; and much more introspective (or perhaps just self-absorbed). An apple lying in the shadow of… Continue reading Core, or: Seeded

Love child, or: Kimo

A kimo There's an Israeli poetic form. It looks like haiku's love child with a lovely landay. What's a kimo? According to this website, kimo poems are an Israeli 🇮🇱 version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar: 3 lines.No rhymes.10… Continue reading Love child, or: Kimo