Jehangir, or: Sangeetha

Blank Verse Handwriting so neat it could have been typed; envelope worn from international journey through the clouds; J. R. D. Tata, the first licensed pilot in India, features on six stamps in the upper left corner, but he's upside-down; I wonder if his flight was turbulent, or whether he rolled, pitched, and yawed for… Continue reading Jehangir, or: Sangeetha

Size, or: What matters

An American sentence: What is the smallest component of a poem that conveys meaning? What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that… Continue reading Size, or: What matters

The Whyquain, or: Creativity verses form

Sangeetha & David's new poetry project Once upon a time, two poets who'd never met in person began writing verses back and forth over the Internet. Their first project took them some nine months: a 100 verse Hyakuin. Once they'd completed their first oeuvre, they decided to continue their journey together; and Sangeetha came up… Continue reading The Whyquain, or: Creativity verses form

How much, or: Yourself

An American sentence: How much of yourself have you given up to belong? Was it worth it? What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total.… Continue reading How much, or: Yourself

Jews, #enduringly stubborn, survive

I was rebuked on Twitter... Since the beginning of 2022, I've been actively responding to various poetry prompts on Twitter, many of which set particular word limits. One such prompt is the #4WordsPoet, which offers a new prompt word every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; and - on February 4th the prompt word was 'enduringly', to… Continue reading Jews, #enduringly stubborn, survive

Death, or: Beyondering

A golden shovel in blank verse EPIGRAPH: I donโ€™t know what happens after death but Iโ€™ll have to chance it.Desert Snow, Jim Harrison (1937 โ€“ 2016) Left alone to my own devices, I oft ponder beyondering, though I don't dare wander past the edges of we-know before twilight. O, Sun, I wonder what, while watching… Continue reading Death, or: Beyondering

Percentage, or: Interest

An American sentence: What percentage of words in any given sentence convey meaning? What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing… Continue reading Percentage, or: Interest

Micropoetry, a reflection

My entry into micropoetry Recently, as I've noted, I completed a series of 365 micropoems, all of which I've scheduled to be posted on my Twitter account at a rate of one per day until Dec. 31st, 2021 (actually, until Jan. 1st, 2022). This experience, as you can imagine, has given me a feel for… Continue reading Micropoetry, a reflection