From above, or: What lies beneath

A Quadrille In the form of a Haibun I found myself tempted to compose a prose poem about the nearly immutable nature of stone. However, my mind wriggled, squirming away from me. Shield limpets, keel worms, snails and other creatures captured my imagination. only lift the rocks to uncover teeming life changelessness belied d’Verse Quadrille… Continue reading From above, or: What lies beneath

Floating, or: Flying

A Haibun I have writer's block, in the sense that all I want to do most days is write; sometimes, it gets in the way of (/blocks me from) being fully present in my life. The composition of poetry is a defining aspect of my every day; it has become impossible for me to conceive… Continue reading Floating, or: Flying

Tidbits of our Sukkot

Two days up north This week, we took the train up to the city of Akko for an annual festival, which we last went to seven years ago - before our daughter was born. Since it takes several hours to get there, we rented an apartment for the night... Otherwise, we would have had to… Continue reading Tidbits of our Sukkot

Drop, or: Fall

A haibun My only child is entering first grade on September 1st... That's the day after tomorrow. I have written before about my anxiety regarding whether or not the Israeli government will allow our children to return to school this year after a year-and-a-half of various lockdowns and quarantines... More than anything, I want her… Continue reading Drop, or: Fall

Twitter poetry 2021: Week 32

My blogger-poet-friend Ingrid inspired me to create a Twitter account and start writing #APoemADay, which I began on January 1, 2021. This week, I posted a series of ukiahs, which are reverse haikus. The syllable count by line for a ukiah is 7-5-7 (the opposite of a haiku), and unlike a haiku, the lines should rhyme. Also, since a… Continue reading Twitter poetry 2021: Week 32

Love child, or: Kimo

A kimo There's an Israeli poetic form. It looks like haiku's love child with a lovely landay. What's a kimo? According to this website, kimo poems are an Israeli 🇮🇱 version of haiku. Apparently, there was a need for more syllables in Hebrew. That said, most of the rules are still familiar: 3 lines.No rhymes.10… Continue reading Love child, or: Kimo

Elul, or: August

A haibun The Hebrew calendar is lunar, rather than solar like the Gregorian calendar, which is used throughout most of the world. However, unlike the lunar Muslim calendar, the Hebrew calendar includes leap years, making Jewish holidays seasonal. Passover, for example, is always in the Spring; Chanukah is always in the Winter. The exact dates… Continue reading Elul, or: August