Expecting, or: Expectant

An American sentence: Great poems gracefully absorb countless meanings imbued by readers. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing the… Continue reading Expecting, or: Expectant

Tesseract, or: Beyond

An Alliterisen Poetry requires rich, dynamic descriptors Witty, winding words make for versatile, vivid verses Scrumptious syllables cleverly comprised of luscious letters: crispy consonants, velvet vowels Fearless phrases so saturated with mysterious meanings, pulling people into romantic realms and dreamy, dappled dimensions The Alliterisen The Alliterisen (Complex and Rhyming), a form created by Udit Bhatia, is… Continue reading Tesseract, or: Beyond

Floor, or: Ceiling

My 2nd kyrielle Kyrielle's rhyme scheme's open, but Three verses is (they say!) the floor. Still, I have come to heed my gut: Few verses are quite often more. I felt doubtful of short forms once; Epics seemed to pack louder roar... Now I know micros aren't runts! Few verses are quite often more. May… Continue reading Floor, or: Ceiling