Peer pressure, or: I resist

A shadorma peer pressure does not draw me as a subject for verse; but my poet community's writing about it I resist the great temptation to compose in free verse like fellow bards just to prove how unique I am Shadorma? six-line stanzas (or sestets); each stanza has a syllable count of 3/5/3/3/7/5, for a… Continue reading Peer pressure, or: I resist

Diaspora, or: Home

My 1st 'Synchronicity' poem EPIGRAPH: All language is a longing for home.-Rumi (1207 โ€“ 1273) I grew up in an immigrant family. At home our tongue was Russian. All my cousins' parents also spoke Russian, but never to my cousins. Only I talked with Babushka and Dedushka in Russian. They liked that. But we are… Continue reading Diaspora, or: Home

The modern poet, or: Slave

An American sentence: Busy blogging, I must not forget to post poems on Twitter too. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt… Continue reading The modern poet, or: Slave

Up, up, or: Away

An American sentence: Ironic that parents at computers tell kids to turn off tablets. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that… Continue reading Up, up, or: Away

Romans, or: Jews

The Western Wall was one of four retaining walls constructed by King Herod around the Temple Mount Never part of the Holy Temple itself, but a symbol of Jewish yearning throughout the centuries of seemingly endless Exile It held no religious significance when the Temple stood but came to represent the Jews' hope of returning… Continue reading Romans, or: Jews

That’s how eye-roll, or: I roll

An American sentence: Look, Friend. We both know these words aren't poetic in the slightest bit. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He… Continue reading That’s how eye-roll, or: I roll

The worse it seemed to get…

An American paragraph* (an experimental form) He wished that not everything had to be so challenging all the time. Clearly, it didn't matter whether he combed his beard thrice; he knew that. Plus, why wake up each morning at seven twenty-seven on the dot? Why should he leave the crust on only one side of… Continue reading The worse it seemed to get…