Some hefty kickbacks

Frostily, deliberately, Speaker Rex Walker arranged his revenge. How dare those upstarts challenge the party leadership? His offer had been reasonable! All they had to do was vote for his bill and receive some hefty kickbacks for their home states. That's how the system worked. His revenge would not be intricate. The party would cut… Continue reading Some hefty kickbacks

The Paris flight

Merle's muscles loosened, as the notes of Delibe's "Flower Duet" wafted into the bathroom. Lakmé was her favorite opera. The Paris flight would be leaving now; and Merle wouldn't see Luca again for at least another week. Her unfaithful husband's "extended business trips" regularly dragged on for undefined stretches; their most recent bitter disagreement of… Continue reading The Paris flight

Loose change, or: Nothing changes

An American sentence: An old man lies on a bench, hand stretched out, cupping a pile of loose change. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17… Continue reading Loose change, or: Nothing changes

Her silk dress fell to the floor

For all the money he'd throw at her, she felt herself his possession and hated it. Finally, she'd had enough. "I'm leaving you," she said, as her silk dress fell to the floor, followed by her jewelry and lingerie. "You can keep everything." Naked, she turned provocatively towards the front door, as he stood there… Continue reading Her silk dress fell to the floor

Skin, or: Bones

Poetry Partners #27 'Skin in the Game' by Audrey Duff of 'Stopping Schadenfreude' It's the horses' sweaty skin that Derby owners claim. Warren Buffet’s first deal, not much skin in that game. Pigs weren’t so lucky in games, Their bladders stretched and stuffed, tossed and bound, for four quarters and a hundred yards. That’s what… Continue reading Skin, or: Bones

Mo money, or: Mo problems

An American sentence: Four bank tellers sit, busy not serving customers with appointments. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing… Continue reading Mo money, or: Mo problems

To be, or: Not to be

My 2nd Duodora EPIGRAPH: To be, or not to be, that is the question:Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to sufferThe slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,Or to take arms against a sea of troublesAnd by opposing end them.(from Hamlet, spoken by Hamlet) Sitting, thinking about rhythms and rhymes; syllables and forms; lines and enjambments;… Continue reading To be, or: Not to be

Give me freedom, or: Give me death

My 1st oddquain Free- dom requires resources, unless 1 refers to the right 2 die Murisopsis' Scavenger Hunt Muri is running a poetry scavenger hunt this month and an oddquain about poverty is #6 on her list. This is also the first in a series of seven oddquains that I'm writing for my #APoemADay challenge,… Continue reading Give me freedom, or: Give me death