Tradition, or: Modernity

An American sentence Yesteryear's modernity is today's venerated tradition. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didn’t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing the line count freed… Continue reading Tradition, or: Modernity

Words wrapped around dreams…

What is poetry?? This is akin to asking “what is happiness?” Poetry is one soul speaking to the universe and hoping that the stars hear. Poetry is emotion woven in words. Poetry is words wrapped around dreams. Poetry is the vulgar made presentable and the presentable made profane. Poetry is an individual definition influenced by… Continue reading Words wrapped around dreams…

It is never our tenderness…

When death, the great reconciler, has come, it is never our tenderness that we repent of, but our severity.-George Eliot (1819 – 1880) A personal thought Written as an American Sentence This must include tenderness (versus severity) towards ourselves. P.S. Yom Kippur (the holiest day of the year for Jews) runs from sunset on Wednesday to… Continue reading It is never our tenderness…

Shabbat, or: Shalom

A dribble Candles are lit; fingers produce no more writing, even as mind continues churning, even as fingers tap to the heart's rhythm. The dribble The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted). The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form… Continue reading Shabbat, or: Shalom

Minutes, or: Mean it

A dribble The minutes before Shabbat are intense when writing \\ poetry. Will the final \\ product satisfy me? I \\ must leave it regardless. The dribble The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted). The name of the dribble is derived from the… Continue reading Minutes, or: Mean it

Lenses, or: Contact

A dribble Poems don't count. People do. Words; syllables; letters aren't you ~ only windows to look through. Stained glass distorts truth. The dribble The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted). The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known… Continue reading Lenses, or: Contact