Delicious, or: Unkosher

Sevenling (I drank)

A d’Verse quadrille

I drank an expensive bottle of red 
wine from Moldova. It was subtle; smooth;
unkosher.

Kosher wines must be produced exclusively 
by Sabbath-observant Jews; open bottles are rendered 
unkosher if even touched by gentiles; this feels to me like racism.

Such delicious wine.

d’Verse

The above sevenling is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #125.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “wine” in a quadrille.


An elucidation

An enactment was put in place in Talmudic times to prevent Jews from consuming wine that had been used for idolatrous purposes. The religious prohibition was extended, such that even if a Jew knows that a particular gentile is not going to engage in idolatry, it is still prohibited to drink wine that was touched by them.

Alexander, or: Alexander

A quadrille in memory of Papa z”l

(in two limericks)

I.

Alexander hacked the Gordian Knot;
Defeated all armies he fought;
With lightning sword,
Secured his reward...
... Unknown remains his burial plot

II.

My Papa conceived 'Cut The Knot',
Believing education ought be rethought
Blazing forth new path,
Spreading passion for math;
Personal gain? Merely... afterthought

The above combination of two limericks is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #124.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “knot” in a quadrille.

Switchgrass, or: Sweet switchel

Switchgrass, swelter, swinking, sweaty 
swivet; thoughts swiftly swirling; swollen, 
swimming eyes; oh! Oh, but to swinge 
that swift, swarthy swindler!

The swashbuckling swine hadn’t swithered, 
swiftly swiping; swith, swiveling, switching 
hands, leaving his lady swooning, swirling her 
sweet switchel on Swiss porch swing… 

Swish…

The above poem is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #123.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “swift” in a quadrille.

Flow, or: Killin’ it

I’m lettin' go, goin' public;
here I go, goin' for it:
I’m goin' grey, have gone bald, 
(not yet blind or deaf);
I've long gone out of fashion;
am goin' downhill;
but I won’t go out softly;
phat flow's 
goin'... 
in... 
for the kill! 🎯

The above poem is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #122.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “go” in a quadrille.

Thisaway, or: Thataway

‘No way. Way!’, a d’Verse Quadrille

Runaway,
wayless, makes his
way up dark
areaway - to
stowaway on a
rockaway.

Highwayman in jet
cutaway strolling past purplish
twayblades, reading stolen
waybill, notes blond
wayward
flyaways.

Hereaway’s no place for young
tearaways, he smiles. Well,
leastways we’re both of
waygoing
lifeways.

The above poem is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #120.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “way” in a quadrille.

Encyclopedia, or: Dictionary

A more than slightly crazy dabbler,
Hair mussed, bedabbled clothes:
   “I am suffering from andabatism!
   So I must call someone who knows!”

He hastily phoned the dabster:
   “I've heard you’re one of the pros!
   Of the dabb; dabchick; daboia-
   Which has the strongest nose?”

The above poem is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #119.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use any form of the word “dab” in a quadrille.

Poem, or: Inglenook

‘In the Inglenook’, a d’Verse Quadrille

Mine inglenook not of this earth 
Found not in book, nor by the hearth 

Mine kooginnel it changes form 
Chooses, refuses to conform 

Mine negloonki of verses spun 
Of metaphor and playful pun 

Mine nielognok for me by me 
Put simply, it's my poetry 

The above poem is my take on d’Verse’s Quadrille challenge #118.

The quadrille is simply a poem of 44 words (excluding the title), and it can take any form. This week’s challenge was to use the word “inglenook” in a quadrille.