Familiar, or: Family man

A kerf "I'd be more useful dead." "At least they'd get the money." "Hell, at least I would finally be free." "Mouths at home would get fed." "So sad, it's almost funny." "My children? Nah, they have no need for me." "Construction doesn't pay." "Ain't no help for a brother." "There's only one way out… Continue reading Familiar, or: Family man

Bee bread, or: Battered

Dedication This tanka prose is dedicated to the inimitable Shira Destinie Jones who has committed her life to developing a sustainable societal framework to provide a basic safety net for each and every child. Tanka prose A safer, empathetic, and sustainable global society in which each person has food, shelter, education, and health care, at… Continue reading Bee bread, or: Battered

Urban scarecrows, or: White plankton

'Neither Snow' by Billy Collins When all of a sudden the city air filled with snow, the distinguishable flakes blowing sideways, looked like krill fleeing the maw of an advancing whale. At least they looked that way to me from the taxi window, and since I happened to be sitting that fading Sunday afternoon in… Continue reading Urban scarecrows, or: White plankton

Pink, or: Blue

A Nonet In the 19th century, girls were assigned blue, a 'dainty' color; pink was 'stronger', so it was assigned to boys. Today's indoctrination's different but no less ar- bi- trar- y. Nonet? A nonet has nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etcโ€ฆ… Continue reading Pink, or: Blue

Israel exempts schoolchildren from quarantine

The last month or so I haven't been keeping exact track, but our first-grader has been in quarantine four (or five?) times in the past month or so. Each time, a teacher or fellow student tested positive with COVID-19, and we had to take her to get her tested - once at the beginning of… Continue reading Israel exempts schoolchildren from quarantine

Stone, or: Water

An American sentence: Language trickles slowly, wearing down our obstinate societies. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17 syllables total. He felt that removing the line… Continue reading Stone, or: Water