The cure for anything

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea. -Karen Blixen (1885 โ€“ 1962) For WQW this week, we are encouraged to write about a memorable trip; but, to be honest, I'm rather a homebody. In fact, for years, when my daughter was very little, I resisted going to the beach with… Continue reading The cure for anything

The Whyquain, or: Creativity verses form

Sangeetha & David's new poetry project Once upon a time, two poets who'd never met in person began writing verses back and forth over the Internet. Their first project took them some nine months: a 100 verse Hyakuin. Once they'd completed their first oeuvre, they decided to continue their journey together; and Sangeetha came up… Continue reading The Whyquain, or: Creativity verses form

The root from which a tyrant springs

The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness... This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector -Plato (~427 โ€“ ~347 BCE) The quote I've selected for this week's WQW is deeply troubling to me. It stopped… Continue reading The root from which a tyrant springs

To brave the cold

There is a chill air surrounding those who are down in the world, and people are glad to get away from them, as from a cold room. -George Eliot (1819 โ€“ 1880) The quote I've selected for this week's WQW encapsulates something that we all know to be true; and if we're honest with ourselves,… Continue reading To brave the cold

Loose threads, or: The needle

An Ovillejo Papa said men should not be swine; He drew a line; Papa said law differs from good; I understood; Papa said I should plan ahead; I lost the thread- Winging my way through life instead; I think back to all he would say, Increasingly... as I turn gray; He drew a line; I… Continue reading Loose threads, or: The needle

Aphorism, or: Trudat

A new aphorism in the form of an American sentence: Novelty may bring self-satisfaction while provoking not a thought. What's an 'American Sentence'? Allen Ginsberg, inventor of the American Sentence, felt that the haiku didnโ€™t work as well in English. Ginsberg decided to remove the line structure of the haiku, maintaining the requirement of 17… Continue reading Aphorism, or: Trudat

Red, or: Blue pill

EPIGRAPH: Doubt is the origin of wisdom. -Renรฉ Descartes (1596 โ€“ 1650) An 'Emmett' poem I doubt enough for all; Doubt tints the lens through which I look; Enough crushing disappointments - that is all it took. For, really, how often can one smash up against a wall? All my silly childhood fantasies, I long… Continue reading Red, or: Blue pill